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Zuse-23

Manufacturer Zuse
Identification,ID Zuse-23
Date of first manufacture1961
Number produced 99
Estimated price or cost200,000 (DM) in 1961. Exchange rate then was about $1 = 4 (DM)
location in museum -
donor -

Contents of this page:

Photo
Zuse-23

Placard
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Architecture

from The Z23 Computer
	a word length of 40 bits
	
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Special features
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Historical Notes
Konrad Zuse pioneered automatic computing in Germany is the late 1930s. Examples and restorations of early work are in Berlin and Munich Germany.
from cctalk@classiccmp.org - RE: starting my relay computer project


> From: philip@axeside.co.uk
> 
> Have you read "The Computer - My Life" by Konrad Zuse (New York: 
> Springer Verlag, 1993. ISBN 0-387-56453-5)? Mostly historical / 
> autobiographical, but some good technical bits on the evolution of relay 
> logic as Zuse's designs got more mature. Interesting how the number of 
> relays per bit he needed in his adder circuit got less and less...
> 

from dwight elvey  dkelvey@hotmail.com        24 Jan 2010
	I always loved his vertually zero delay carry. At least
	it was zero for relays. It was something that one
	would not think of just looking at a single bit or
	even normal logic of digital stuff.
	Dwight

This Artifact
Computer History Museum info Restoration of the Z-23

Interesting Web Sites

Other information

Message: 6
Date: Sat, 28 Aug 2010 10:17:46 +0200
From: Jochen Kunz 
Subject: Meet a Zuse Z23
To: cctalk@classiccmp.org
Message-ID: <20100828101746.8fa9a330.jkunz@unixag-kl.fh-kl.de>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Hi.

This week I had the pleasure to visit a Zuse Z23 on display in my city.
The Z23 is a first generation, discrete transistor and diode logic, drum
based machine with a small "cache" of core memory. It is hosted at the
Fraunhofer Institute for Experimental Software Engineering. Here is the
Press release regarding the Zuse machine:
http://www.iese.fraunhofer.de/de/presse/current_releases/PM-2010-16-210610z23.jsp

Ohh, if you can't read german (at all we are talking about a german
computer ;-) ) here is the english version:

http://www.iese.fraunhofer.de/press/current_releases/PM-2010-16-210610z23.jsp

I took some pictures:

http://www.unixag-kl.fh-kl.de/~jkunz/bilder/Zuse_Z23/
The machine is in very good, but not working condition. I suspect it
would be a huge task to make it operable again, like the PDP-1
restoration. But it could be done. There is a complete set of
documentation, schematics, some spare parts, ... A former user of that
machine from the local university explained the machine and its inner
workings in detail to us. In one word: Fascinating! :-)

BTW: There is a tube based Zuse Z22 in working condition on display in
the ZKM museum in Karlsruhe (Germany). The Z23 is kind of a transistor
reimplementation of the Z22:
http://www.zkm.de/algorithmische-revolution/index.php?module=pagemaster&PAGE_user_op=view_page&PAGE_id=118
Pictures only in the german version:
http://www.zkm.de/algorithmische-revolution/index.php?module=pagemaster&PAGE_user_op=view_page&PAGE_id=131
-- 


\end{Jochen}



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